Lyon Group

61 Mound House

on U.S. Highway 50 six miles east of Carson City, Nevada

Mound House was located one-half mile north of this point. Originally constructed in 1871 as a station and siding on the Virginia and Truckee Railroad, it served for some time simply as a wood and water stop. In 1877, a post office was established. Mound House came into its own in 1880, when the V & T began construction of a narrow-gauge railroad from here to the mining camps of western Nevada and the Owens Valley region of California. Named the Carson & Colorado, it turned Mound House into a booming shipping point.

The Southern Pacific Railroad purchased the C & C from the V & T in 1900, just prior to the Tonopah silver strike. In 1905, the Southern Pacific built a short line from its new station at Hazen, on the main line, to intersect the C & C at Fort Churchill. The Hazen cutoff took most of the booming Tonopah-Goldfield business away from the V & T.

From 1900 to 1920, extensive gypsum mining and milling operations, to produce plaster, were carried on immediately northwest of Mound House.

The narrow-gauge line was abandoned from Mound House to Fort Churchill in 1934 and the V & T track from Carson City to Virginia City in 1938. Within a few years, Mound House had disappeared.

7 Dayton

on U.S. Highway 50 at Dayton, Nevada

Dayton, one of the earliest settlements in Nevada, was first known as a stopping place on the river for California–bound pioneers. Coming in from the desert, they rested here before continuing westward.

In 1849, Abner Blackburn found a gold nugget at the mouth of Gold Canyon and prospecting began in the canyon to the north. Ten years later, this led to the discovery of the fabulous ore deposits at Gold Hill and Virginia City.

Called by several different names in its early years, the place became Dayton in 1861, named in honor of John Day who laid out the town.

For many decades Dayton prospered as a mill and trading center. It remained the county seat for Lyon County until 1911.